Research Article

A LIMA1 variant promotes low plasma LDL cholesterol and decreases intestinal cholesterol absorption

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Science  08 Jun 2018:
Vol. 360, Issue 6393, pp. 1087-1092
DOI: 10.1126/science.aao6575

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  • RE: A LIMA1 variant promotes low plasma LDL cholesterol and decreases intestinal cholesterol absorption
    • Lin-Gao Ju, Researcher, Department of Biological Repositories, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University
    • Other Contributors:
      • Kaiyu Qian, Researcher, Department of Biological Repositories, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University
      • Yu Xiao, Professor, Department of Biological Repositories, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University
      • Xinghuan Wang, Professor, Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University

    The new age of Chinese characteristic biological repositories

    Lin-Gao Ju1,2, Kaiyu Qian1,2, Yu Xiao1,2,3, Xinghuan Wang2,3,*

    1Department of Biological Repositories, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071, China
    2Human Genetics Resource Preservation Center of Hubei Province, Wuhan, 430071, China
    3Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071, China
    *Corresponding author. E-mail: wangxinghuan@whu.edu.cn

    Translational medicine involves transformation of laboratory findings into new ways to diagnose and treatment for patients. However, a large amount of basic research has less than one percent clinical transformation (1). Such a dilemma is expected to be solved through the effective use of the biological repositories. In 2016, President Xi Jinping announced the Healthy China 2030 blueprint (2). As the cornerstone of clinical research and precision medicine, development of biological repositories in China has received unprecedented attention.

    There are great racial differences in the pathogenesis and clinical features of diseases in Eastern and Western cohorts, therefore, the therapeutic regimens in West are not necessarily suitable for Chinese people. For instance, Ren et al. found novel gene fusions and biomarkers for prostate cancer among the Chinese population (3, 4). Thus, it is essential to established Chinese characteristic biological rep...

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    Competing Interests: None declared.