Feature

Unearthing democracy's roots

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Science  17 Mar 2017:
Vol. 355, Issue 6330, pp. 1114-1118
DOI: 10.1126/science.355.6330.1114

Figures

  • Public plazas were scattered through every neighborhood in the republic of Tlaxcallan. Some had modest temples like this one built off to one side.

    PHOTO: © ADAM WISEMAN
  • Teotihuacan puzzles archaeologists: It shows signs of both autocratic rule (this grand avenue and pyramids) and collectivity (a grid of roads and no depictions of kings).

    PHOTO: © MARCOS FERRO/AURORA PHOTOS
  • A tale of two citiesCREDITS: (GRAPHIC) G. GRULLÓN/SCIENCE; (DATA) L. F. FARGHER ET AL., JOURNAL OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 313, 317 (2011) © ELSEVIER
  • Tlaxcalteca warriors helped the Spanish conquer the nearby centralized city of Tenochtitlan in 1521. Conquistador Hernán Cortés included this map of Tenochtitlan in his second letter to the Spanish crown.

    PHOTO: NEWBERRY LIBRARY, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS/BRIDGEMAN IMAGES

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